Botox costs can vary anywhere from $200 to $400 or more depending on the physician, location, units purchased, desired profit margin, ongoing promotions, etc. Many doctor's offices price Botox based on cost per unit, but others price Botox injections based on the area of the injection. Whether Botox is charged by the unit or by the area might not matter that much if the Botox treatment is effective, but if you want to know exactly how much you are paying for your treatment, you need to know the number of units of Botox per treatment and the cost per unit. (An honest practice will not hesitate to give you this information if you ask.)
Therefore, it is important to remember that if a clinic or medical spa states that they are providing Botox at a certain dollar amount per unit, it is quite possible that they are diluting the Botox and actually not providing the agreed-upon amount. This is much like the concept of a watered-down drink at a bar, but the costs are much larger when it comes to Botox or its alternatives, Dysport and Xeomin.
Do not inject into blood vessels. Introduction of these products into the vasculature may lead to embolization, occlusion of the vessels, ischemia, or infarction. Take extra care when injecting soft-tissue fillers; for example, inject the product slowly and apply the least amount of pressure necessary. Rare, but serious, adverse events associated with the intravascular injection of soft-tissue fillers in the face have been reported and include temporary or permanent vision impairment, blindness, cerebral ischemia or cerebral hemorrhage leading to stroke, skin necrosis, and damage to underlying facial structures. Immediately stop the injection if a patient exhibits any of the following symptoms: changes in vision, signs of a stroke, blanching of the skin, unusual pain during or shortly after the procedure. Patients should receive prompt medical attention and, possibly, evaluation by an appropriate healthcare professional specialist should an intravascular injection occur
This medication can spread to other parts of the body after your injection, causing serious (possibly fatal) side effects. These can occur hours or even weeks after the injection. However, the chances of such serious side effects occurring when this medication is used for migraines or skin conditions such as wrinkles, eye spasm, or excessive sweating are extremely unlikely.
I usually keep my patients on migraine preventative medications until we have seen sufficient relief of migraine to warrant a taper to a lower dose or even an attempt at medication discontinuation. Patients are free to use their typical migraine abortive medications for breakthrough migraines. There are some patients that find that they still require their other anti-migraine medications for full migraine control.
The needle should be inserted approximately 2 mm into the detrusor, and 20 injections of 0.5 mL each (total volume of 10 mL) should be spaced approximately 1 cm apart (see Figure 1). For the final injection, approximately 1 mL of sterile normal saline should be injected so that the remaining BOTOX in the needle is delivered to the bladder. After the injections are given, patients shou ld demonstrate their ability to void prior to leaving the clinic. The patient should be obser ved for at least 30 minutes post-injection and until a spontaneous void has occurred.
Some industry insiders say it's not unusual, if still legally murky, for drug-company representatives and doctors to share information with one another about the different ways an approved drug may be used. If a doctor notices that, say, a treatment for crossed eyes also "takes the lines out," he may mention it to the representative from whom he buys the drugs. That rep may share that with another of his clients, and so on.
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The overall cost of  the injection is charged either at a flat rate or per unit. In terms of per unit, the overall cost of the treatment will depend on the total volume or a total number of units used in the procedure. But service charged at a flat rate depends on the area to be treated. The most expensive area is around the underarm for treating hyperhidrosis.

Jump up ^ Dodick DW, Turkel CC, DeGryse RE, Aurora SK, Silberstein SD, Lipton RB, Diener HC, Brin MF (June 2010). "OnabotulinumtoxinA for treatment of chronic migraine: pooled results from the double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled phases of the PREEMPT clinical program". Headache. 50 (6): 921–36. doi:10.1111/j.1526-4610.2010.01678.x. PMID 20487038.
Most people tolerate the injection discomfort well. But you may want your skin to be numbed beforehand, especially if your palms or soles are being treated for excessive sweating. Your doctor might use one or more of various methods available to numb the area, such as topical anesthesia, ice and vibration anesthesia, which uses massage to reduce discomfort.
I increase the dose at each treatment cycle to 195 units. This is based on experience with patients with cervical dystonia, in whom higher doses result in a longer duration of effect. In addition, I transition to the next onabotulinumtoxinA treatment at 12 weeks by using occipital and trigeminal nerve blocks at 10 weeks. Most insurance companies will not cover onabotulinumtoxinA treatments earlier than 12 weeks, but in rare cases, 10-week cycles have been approved.
Migraine with visual aura involves visual effects that usually precede the headache and last at least 5 minutes. The visual aura is usually an expanding blinding spot or visual scintillations (shimmering objects in the visual field). Other aura features include reversible symptoms of speech and language difficulty such as word-finding problems and aphasia (inability to express words or comprehend words), sensory phenomena such as tingling in the extremities extending to the face, motor effects such as weakness, and brainstem problems such as unsteadiness and features of cranial nerve dysfunction. These aura symptoms usually last 5 to 60 minutes, can precede or start during the headache, and can also occur without a headache.

Severe side effects are very rare but can happen if the botulinum toxin unexpectedly spreads throughout the body from the site of the shots. This can cause muscle weakness, hoarseness or trouble talking, trouble saying words clearly, loss of bladder control, trouble breathing, trouble swallowing, double vision, blurred vision and drooping eyelids. The breathing and swallowing problems can be life-threatening. If this happens, seek medical attention right away.


With abnormal joint movement and inactivity, muscles can shorten and contract. In the case of muscle spasticity, the joint and soft tissue can be normal, but with constant contraction of a muscle because of spasticity the muscle can shorten. When it can no longer stretch to allow full range of motion, a contracture can happen. Agents that lessen the spasticity of the involved muscles best prevent this type of contracture.
The patient’s neck stability, posture, torsion, and symmetry should be assessed to determine whether he or she may be at increased risk for adverse events prior to the first injection cycle. A patient with preexisting neck pain and/or weakness may be at higher risk for exacerbation of the condition upon injection of the occipitalis, cervical paraspinal, or trapezius muscle groups. Patients with smaller frames may be at higher risk for neck weakness. Indicated injection sites can still be injected with minimal side effects and unwanted outcomes as long as correct injection sites are targeted and treatments are administered using a superficial approach with avoidance of the mid and lower cervical regions. The cervical paraspinal muscle group is made up of multiple muscles including the trapezius, splenius capitis and cervicis, and semispinalis capitus. This group of muscles helps support the neck, including extension of the head.
Postmarketing safety data from BOTOX and other approved botulinum toxins suggest that botulinum toxin effects may, in some cases, be observed beyond the site of local injection. The symptoms are consistent with the mechanism of action of botulinum toxin and may include asthenia, generalized muscle weakness, diplopia, ptosis, dysphagia, dysphonia, dysarthria, urinary incontinence, and breathing difficulties. These symptoms have been reported hours to weeks after injection. Swallowing and breathing difficulti es can be life threatening and there have been reports of death related to spread of toxin effects. The risk of symptoms is probably greatest in children treated for spasticity but symptoms can also occur in adults treated for spasticity and other conditions, and partic ularly in those patients who have an underlying condition that would predispose them to these symptoms. In unapproved uses, including spasticity in children, and in approved indications, symptoms consistent with spread of toxin effect have been reported at do ses comparable to or lower than doses used to treat cervical dystonia and spasticity. Patients or caregivers should be advised to seek immediate medical care if swallowing, speech or respiratory disorders occur.
The cosmetic effect of BTX-A on wrinkles was originally documented by a plastic surgeon from Sacramento, California, Richard Clark, and published in the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery in 1989.[51] Canadian husband and wife ophthalmologist and dermatologist physicians, JD and JA Carruthers, were the first to publish a study on BTX-A for the treatment of glabellar frown lines in 1992.[52] Similar effects had reportedly been observed by a number of independent groups (Brin, and the Columbia University group under Monte Keen.[53]) After formal trials, on April 12, 2002, the FDA announced regulatory approval of botulinum toxin type A (Botox Cosmetic) to temporarily improve the appearance of moderate-to-severe frown lines between the eyebrows (glabellar lines).[54] Subsequently, cosmetic use of botulinum toxin type A has become widespread.[78] The results of Botox Cosmetic can last up to four months and may vary with each patient.[79] The US Food and Drug Administration approved an alternative product-safety testing method in response to increasing public concern that LD50 testing was required for each batch sold in the market.[55][56]
So when I first propositioned my husband about the idea of me getting a bit of Botox for the furrowed brow I've earned from a decade of writing and editing behind a computer screen, he was adamantly against it. And frankly, I was a bit scared too. I mean, isn't Botox poison? As an idealistic 21 year old, it was easy to say that I'd never put that stuff in my body, that "poison." Now, I'm not so sure.
But it could be something else altogether. In 2008, Matteo Caleo, a researcher at the Italian National Research Council's Institute of Neuroscience in Pisa, published a controversial study showing that when he injected the muscles of rats with Botox, he found evidence of the drug in the brain stem. He also injected Botox into one side of the brain in mice and found that it spread to the opposite side. That suggested the toxin could access the nervous system and the brain.
A placebo-controlled, double-blind post-approval 52 week study with BOTOX 100 Units (Study NDO-3) was conducted in non-catheterizing MS patients with urinary incontinence due to detrusor overactivity associated with a neurologic condition. Catheterization for urinary retention was initiated in 15.2% (10/66) of patients following treatment with BOTOX 100 Units versus 2.6% (2/78) on placebo at any time during the complete treatment cycle. The median duration of post-injection catheterization for those who developed urinary retention was 64 days for BOTOX 100 Units and 2 days for placebo.
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It is not known whether BOTOX® is safe or effective to treat increased stiffness in upper limb muscles other than those in the elbow, wrist, fingers, and thumb, or in lower limb muscles other than those in the ankle and toes. BOTOX® has not been shown to help people perform task-specific functions with upper limbs or increase movement in joints that are permanently fixed in position by stiff muscles. BOTOX® is not meant to replace existing physical therapy or other rehabilitation that may have been prescribed.
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