The frontalis muscle attaches to the skin of the lower forehead and ascends to join the fronto-occipital aponeurosis. The action of the frontalis muscle involves elevation of the eyebrows to produce expressions such as surprise, and can cause deep transverse wrinkles on the forehead. The antagonists for brow depression are the corrugators, procerus, and orbicularis oculi muscles.
Botox injections like other goods and services in New York City are typically more expensive then in the suburbs where the rent and salaries are also less expensive. So it is true that in general Botox cost more in NYC. In one vial of Botox there is 100 units of medicine and each unit costs on average $20. Most patients require between 20 to 60 units.That translates into an average between $400 and $1200.
Study 3 compared 3 doses of BOTOX with placebo and enrolled 88 patients [BOTOX 360 Units (N=23), BOTOX 180 Units (N=23), BOTOX 90 Units (N=23), and placebo (N=19)] with upper limb spasticity (expanded Ashworth score of at least 2 for elbow flexor tone and at least 3 for wrist flexor tone and/or finger flexor tone) who were at least 6 weeks post -stroke. BOTOX and placebo were injected with EMG guidance into the flexor digitorum profundus, flexor digitorum sublimi s, flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, and biceps brachii (see Table 27).

Three percent of patients experienced eyelid drooping in the frown lines studies, one percent of patients experienced eyelid swelling in the crow's feet studies, and one percent of patients experienced brow drooping in the forehead lines studies. Other possible side effects include: dry mouth; discomfort or pain at the injection site; tiredness; headache; neck pain; eye problems: double vision, blurred vision, decreased eyesight and dry eyes; and allergic reactions. These are not all of the possible serious side effects of BOTOX® Cosmetic. Please see the Important Safety Information including Boxed Warning and Medication Guide and talk to your specialist.
In a double-blind study of 123 adults with regular, chronic migraine, the adults receiving botulinum toxin type A experienced fewer migraine attacks each month. In addition, attacks they did experience were less intense, of shorter duration, and required less treatment than adults who did not receive Botox injections for migraine. These injections were also well-tolerated in adults experiencing migraine with and without aura.

Patients should shave underarms and abstain from use of over-the-counter deodorants or antiperspirants for 24 hours prior to the test. Patient should be resting comfortably without exercise, hot drinks for approximately 30 minutes prior to the test. Dry the underarm area and then immediately paint it with iodine solution. Allow the area to dry, then lightly sprinkle the area with starch powder. Gently blow off any excess starch powder. The hyperhidrotic area will develop a deep blue-black color over approximately 10 minutes.


The biological blocking powers of Botox are used to treat migraines, muscular disorders, and some and bowel disorders. It can treat muscle stiffness, muscle spasms, overactive bladder, or loss of bladder control, too. It's also used to stop excessive sweating. "Botox blocks glands the same way it blocks nerves in muscles," Sobel tells SELF. However, don't expect to stop sweating entirely, he says. "You've got to sweat somewhere." What's more, Botox will last far longer in these sweaty situations since the glands are far smaller than the muscles treated, says Rowe.

30+ year migraine warrior, wife, mother, corporate exec turned health advocate, Paula is Migraine Again Managing Editor and Chief Encouragement Officer. She champions patient's needs as an American Migraine Foundation Board Member, CHAMP Coalition Leader, IHS Patient Advocate and co-author of CaMEO and My Migraine Voice research studies. In addition to hosting the Migraine Again Podcast and producing the Migraine World Summit, Paula is a frequent speaker at industry, health care and public policy events. She's also the Founder and CEO of the World Health Education Foundation, a 501c3. Follow her on LinkedIn or Facebook.

Before I could try Botox, my health insurance — Cigna — required me to try and fail at least two other meds. I tried tricyclic antidepressants, which made me groggy and turned my brain into molasses, and beta blockers, a class of drugs used for high blood pressure and heart problems. (All treatments to prevent migraines are borrowed from other conditions, except a new class of drugs that was just approved by the Food and Drug Administration.) The beta blockers worked for a few months: they slightly reduced the number of migraines and made the headaches more bearable. But late last year, the migraines became chronic again — I had more than 15 in a month. That’s when my neurologist said: “I think it’s time to try Botox.”
Tell your doctor if you received any other botulinum toxin product in the last 4 months; have received injections of botulinum toxin such as Myobloc®, Dysport®, or Xeomin® in the past (tell your doctor exactly which product you received); have recently received an antibiotic injection; take muscle relaxants; take allergy or cold medicines; take sleep medicine; take aspirin-like products or blood thinners.
It is not known whether BOTOX® is safe or effective to treat increased stiffness in upper limb muscles other than those in the elbow, wrist, fingers, and thumb, or in lower limb muscles other than those in the ankle and toes. BOTOX® has not been shown to help people perform task-specific functions with their upper limbs or increase movement in joints that are permanently fixed in position by stiff muscles. Treatment with BOTOX® is not meant to replace existing physical therapy or other rehabilitation that may have been prescribed.
×