Botox often gets a bad rep for leaving patients looking a little frozen, but that's the fault of bad technique, not necessarily the procedure itself, explains Day. "In many places where it's not a trained aesthetic physician doing the injection, it's really just inject by number," she says. The problem with this is that no two faces, or even two sides of a face, are the same. "That cookie cutter, one-size-fits-all approach is what often gives these treatments a bad name," says Day.
Sharona Hoffman, professor of law and bioethics at Case Western Reserve University School of Law, says that step therapy is driven by a single motivator: saving costs. Hoffman, who’s written about the legal and ethical implications of step therapy, says that sometimes step therapy can have sensible outcomes, like pushing patients to take generics instead of brand-name drugs. But these policies can also keep doctors from prescribing the more expensive drugs of choice, forcing patients to take medications that are less effective or have worse side effects.

Cornea problems have been reported. Cornea (surface of the eye) problems have been reported in some people receiving BOTOX® for their blepharospasm, especially in people with certain nerve disorders. BOTOX® may cause the eyelids to blink less, which could lead to the surface of the eye being exposed to air more than is usual. Tell your doctor if you experience any problems with your eyes while receiving BOTOX®. Your doctor may treat your eyes with drops, ointments, contact lenses, or with an eye patch.
With this in mind, the average cost for treating forehead lines varies from approximately $200 to $600. Patients with fine lines or smaller facial muscles won’t require as many units of Botox to achieve a successful outcome, whereas patients with stronger facial muscles (such as pronounced corrugator muscles which cause deeper frown lines) could require more.
The patient is placed in a somewhat raised position on the exam table, and the areas to be injected are cleansed with a nonalcohol cleanser, such as Hibiclens or Betadine. Some physicians will apply a topical anesthetic, such as EMLA cream or some alternative, at this time. The Botox is then injected into the desired areas. Typical injection patterns include about four or five areas on each side of the forehead and two or three areas on either eye area. More areas can be injected by skilled physicians, depending on the type of wrinkles and the desired effect for the patient. It is common for pressure to be applied if an area seems to be bleeding after the injection. While ice is sometimes applied beforehand for comfort reasons, direct pressure is much more effective than ice for control of bleeding and bruising.

Migraine with visual aura involves visual effects that usually precede the headache and last at least 5 minutes. The visual aura is usually an expanding blinding spot or visual scintillations (shimmering objects in the visual field). Other aura features include reversible symptoms of speech and language difficulty such as word-finding problems and aphasia (inability to express words or comprehend words), sensory phenomena such as tingling in the extremities extending to the face, motor effects such as weakness, and brainstem problems such as unsteadiness and features of cranial nerve dysfunction. These aura symptoms usually last 5 to 60 minutes, can precede or start during the headache, and can also occur without a headache.

BOTOX® is the brand name of a toxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. In large amounts, this toxin can cause a form of muscle paralysis known as botulism, which is usually associated with food poisoning. Even though one of the most serious complications of botulism is paralysis, scientists have discovered a way to use it to human advantage. Small, diluted (weakened) amounts can be directly injected into specific muscles, causing controlled relaxation of the muscles.
A recent encounter with one of my headache patients got me thinking. I am treating this young woman for chronic migraine with BOTOX injections. She told me that one of her other physicians had been surprised to hear about this use for onabotulinumtoxin A. According to my patient, the gastroenterologist’s words were, “BOTOX for migraines? I’ve never heard of that.” 
A concern of both parents and children is whether these injections will be painful. There is no pain linked to the action of the toxin itself, only with the needle injections. To lessen this problem, the skin where the injections will be done is coated with EMLA cream before the procedure . A topical coolant spray is also used right before the needle is put in. This numbs the skin. The child may still feel pressure from the needle and a dull feeling in the muscle. The fact that a child is having a procedure done and is being held in place can upset a child more than the needle going in, even more so for preschool-aged children.
Allergan says Botox is well established as a drug and that the benefits and risks of toxins are well understood. "With more than 25 years of real-world clinical experience ... approximately 3,200 articles in scientific and medical journals, marketing authorizations in more than 90 markets and many different indications, Botox and Botox Cosmetic are [among] the most widely researched medicines in the world," an Allergan rep wrote in an emailed statement.
Most practices have a flat cost for each injection of BOTOX® Cosmetic, though some will break it down by “units” used per treatment. Flat rates are usually somewhere between $300 and $1000, while per-unit rates are usually around $10-15 per unit. Though the BOTOX® Cosmetic price paid by physicians is normally about $400 for each vial (each vial contains 100 units, or enough for about 4 or 5 treatments), the vial must be used within a few hours of opening, so if the entire vial is not used, the physician will often have to throw the rest out.
The recommended dilution is 200 Units/4 mL or 100 Units/2 mL, with a final concentration of 5 Units per 0.1 mL (see Table 1). The recommended dose for treating chronic migraine is 155 Units ad ministered intramuscularly using a sterile 30-gauge, 0.5 inch needle as 0.1 mL (5 Units) injections per each site. Injections should be divided across 7 specific head/neck muscle areas as specified in the diagrams and Table 2 below. A one inch needle may be needed in the neck region for patients with thick neck muscles. With the exception of the procerus muscle, which should be injected at one site (midline), all muscles should be injected bilaterally with half the number of injection sites administered to the left, and half to the right side of the head and neck. The recommended re-treatment schedule is every 12 weeks.

"Botox is a toxin that is extracted from a certain bacteria. It's been used for a couple of hundred years in medicine. It was first used in neurological conditions rather than cosmetic ones. It was first approved to treat spasms of the face and eye muscles. Only later was it discovered coincidentally that it could world for cosmetic purposes, like wrinkles," he says.


If you are seeking a Botox specialist, I have more than thirty years experience injecting Botox in New York City and New Jersey. I am a recognized oculoplastic surgeon – you can find me on Google as Dr. Joel E. Kopelman. I have authored several peer reviewed articles regarding the efficacy and safety of Botox injections. You can easily make an appointment to see me in consultation at our office +1 (212) 831-8333 to set up a consultation with me in either New York or New Jersey.
Most people tolerate the injection discomfort well. But you may want your skin to be numbed beforehand, especially if your palms or soles are being treated for excessive sweating. Your doctor might use one or more of various methods available to numb the area, such as topical anesthesia, ice and vibration anesthesia, which uses massage to reduce discomfort.
In double-blind, placebo-controlled chronic migraine efficacy trials (Study 1 and Study 2), the discontinuation rate was 12% in the BOTOX treated group and 10% in the placebo-treated group. Discontinuations due to an adverse event were 4% in the BOTOX group and 1% in the placebo group. The most frequent adverse events leading to discontinuation in the BOTOX group were neck pain, headache, worsening migraine, muscular weakness and eyelid ptosis.
Most physicians pay roughly the same amount of money to purchase a vial of Botox. However, the cost of a Botox treatment is not the same among all providers. Botox is not an ordinary commodity such as wheat or sugar or flour. Botox is a medical procedure that requires nuance, experience and expertise. All Botox providers are not equal in education or skill and some are actually quite poor. Most Botox providers charge either by the amount of Botox used or by the region of the face treated. I feel that charging by the amount of Botox used is the most equitable.

For blepharospasm, reconstituted BOTOX is injected using a sterile, 27-30 gauge needle without electromyographic guidance. The initial recommended dose is 1.25 Units-2.5 Units (0.05 mL to 0.1 mL volume at each site) injected into the medial and lateral pre tarsal orbicularis oculi of the upper lid and into the lateral pre-tarsal orbicularis oculi of the lower lid. Avoiding injection near the levator palpebrae superioris may reduce the complication of ptosis. Avoiding medial lower lid injections, and thereby reducin g diffusion into the inferior oblique, may reduce the complication of diplopia. Ecchymosis occurs easily in the soft eyelid tissues. This can be prevented by applying pressure at the injection site immediately after the injection.
Some doctors and dermatologists recommend lying down and resting after a treatment, but Ravitz says she doesn't think there's any need for downtime unless a patient experiences pain. It can take about two weeks to work, though some patients start to feel relief from chronic migraines sooner than that. Ravitz tells me, "If it’s going to work for a patient, one round of the treatment typically lasts for around three months." Though everybody metabolizes it at a different rate, getting it done every three months or so has been found to be effective.
Botox stays only where injected, it does not roam through the body. "If I inject it in your face, it's not going to work [or show up in] your toe," says Rowe. "It does not have a systemic effect." However, it may migrate up to 3 cm from where it was injected. But even if some molecules were to go into the bloodstream and travel to distant sites in the body, the cosmetic doses (typically less than 100 units) used are significantly lower than the toxic dose that would be harmful systemically (2,500-3,000 units).

Botox is a neurotoxin derived from the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Ingested in contaminated food, it can interfere with key muscles in the body, causing paralysis and even death. But when injected in tiny doses into targeted areas, it can block signals between nerves and muscles, causing the muscles to relax. That's how it smooths wrinkles: when you immobilize the muscles that surround fine lines, those lines are less likely to move--making them less noticeable. It's also why it's FDA-approved to treat an overactive bladder: Botox can prevent involuntary muscle contractions that can cause people to feel like they have to pee even when they don't.
The recommended dilution is 200 Units/4 mL or 100 Units/2 mL, with a final concentration of 5 Units per 0.1 mL (see Table 1). The recommended dose for treating chronic migraine is 155 Units ad ministered intramuscularly using a sterile 30-gauge, 0.5 inch needle as 0.1 mL (5 Units) injections per each site. Injections should be divided across 7 specific head/neck muscle areas as specified in the diagrams and Table 2 below. A one inch needle may be needed in the neck region for patients with thick neck muscles. With the exception of the procerus muscle, which should be injected at one site (midline), all muscles should be injected bilaterally with half the number of injection sites administered to the left, and half to the right side of the head and neck. The recommended re-treatment schedule is every 12 weeks.

The Allergan Foundation is proud to support charitable organizations and programs having a Bold impact on communities where Allergan employees live and work. Community Grant applications are considered annually from qualified U.S.-based tax-exempt public charities with innovative and leading programs and services, well-defined goals, a commitment to maximizing resources, and a reputation for meeting objectives and reporting measured results. The Allergan Foundation is primarily focused on supporting programs that improve the health and well-being of our communities.


Botox should definitely last longer than a few weeks, but how much longer varies. First time Botox users, for example, might experience Botox wearing off in less than 3 months. However, as facial muscles get conditioned to Botox, results should lengthen. Botox injections around the eyes can also last shorter than 3 months. Men, on the other hand, tend to need more Botox than women. Whatever the case, Botox results should generally last around 3 months, give or take a few days.

“Most people in their twenties decide to try Botox simply because they want to enhance their appearance, such as relaxing the muscles in their forehead, or because they want to keep their skin looking fresh and young,” Shah says. “Starting earlier is better than later because as the lines get more and more embedded into the skin, Botox is not as effective in eliminating the lines.”
A recent encounter with one of my headache patients got me thinking. I am treating this young woman for chronic migraine with BOTOX injections. She told me that one of her other physicians had been surprised to hear about this use for onabotulinumtoxin A. According to my patient, the gastroenterologist’s words were, “BOTOX for migraines? I’ve never heard of that.” 

The safe and effective use of BOTOX depends upon proper storage of the product, selection of the correct dose, and proper reconstitution and administration techniques. An understanding of standard electromyographic techniques is also required for treatment of strabismus, upper or lower limb spasticity, and may be useful for the treatment of cervical dystonia. Physicians administering BOTOX must understand the relevant neuromuscular and structural anatomy of the area involved and any alterations to the anatomy due to prior surgical procedures and disease, especially when injecting near the lungs.


How Long Do Botox Treatments Last?  Before you begin you should know that effects of Botox last about three to four months. That’s all – when practitioners make claim that it lasts longer don’t believe them because it doesn’t. So when you factor in the cost of Botox or Dysport you should know that in order to maintain the beneficial effects of these injections you will probably repeat the treatment three to four times a year.
Strabismus is caused by imbalances in the actions of muscles that rotate the eyes, and can sometimes be relieved by weakening a muscle that pulls too strongly, or pulls against one that has been weakened by disease or trauma. Muscles weakened by toxin injection recover from paralysis after several months, so it might seem that injection would then need to be repeated. However, muscles adapt to the lengths at which they are chronically held,[18] so that if a paralyzed muscle is stretched by its antagonist, it grows longer, while the antagonist shortens, yielding a permanent effect. If there is good binocular vision, the brain mechanism of motor fusion, which aligns the eyes on a target visible to both, can stabilize the corrected alignment.
Intradetrusor injection of BOTOX is contraindicated in patients with overactive bladder or detrusor overactivity associated with a neurologic condition who have a urinary tract infection. Intradetrusor injection of BOTOX is also contraindicated in patients with urinary retention and in patients with post-void residual (PVR) urine volume >200 mL, who are not routinely performing clean intermittent self-catheterization (CIC).

BOTOX may be an effective treatment for those who suffer from chronic migraines. Many patients have struggled to find a treatment that truly provides relief from this debilitating condition. While there are migraine medications and a host of natural remedies, for many people, none of these methods bring real relief. BOTOX may be the option that brings the relief from pain that patients have been seeking for so long.
The 3rd Annual Migraine Moment Film Contest received a record-breaking number of film submissions this year. Each film delivered a unique message on living with migraine and how people cope with the symptoms that accompany this debilitating disease. At the 60th Annual Scientific Meeting in San Francisco earlier this year, Maria Galli was announced as the contest’s winner. Her powerful film, Invisible Hero, spoke to her strength and superhero-like qualities in fighting a disease that oftentimes makes her feel isolated and alone. In a recent Facebook Live hosted by the American Foundation, Maria Galli spoke with Dr. Bert Vargas, a Neurologist at UT Southwestern, about her experience living with chronic migraine and her outstanding work. [embed]https://www.facebook.com/americanmigrainefoundation/videos/1616373701807260/[/embed]
I love talking about migraines. I don't do it to be a downer; I do it because talking about dealing with my chronic migraines may lead to hearing tips from another fellow sufferer, and I've tried nearly everything at this point. I've dealt with migraines for almost two decades, and as anyone who deals with them knows, having a variety of remedies in your toolbox is crucial when the pain hits.
The FDA approval was based on a large study showing that Botox significantly reduced migraine frequency and severity, as well as headache-related disability, compared to placebo. As just one measure of its effectiveness, many of my patients report that they’ve cut their use of rescue medications in half since starting Botox – a significant benefit for people who previously had to resort to rescue medications 15 or more times every month.
It is not known whether BOTOX® is safe or effective to treat increased stiffness in upper limb muscles other than those in the elbow, wrist, fingers, and thumb, or in lower limb muscles other than those in the ankle and toes. BOTOX® has not been shown to help people perform task-specific functions with upper limbs or increase movement in joints that are permanently fixed in position by stiff muscles. BOTOX® is not meant to replace existing physical therapy or other rehabilitation that may have been prescribed.
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