Injection description is very important. It is best to describe the injections as a pinch rather than a bee sting, and to explain that the injections are shallow, with only a half-inch needle. As a result of the superficial technique used with the injections, deep anticoagulation can be continued. The procedure is short, and talking to the patient during the procedure about something other than the injections can help alleviate the patient’s anxiety. It is important to describe onabotulinumtoxinA as a purified protein rather than a toxin or a poison. In addition, stating that it relaxes muscles rather than causing paralysis will be reassuring to the patient. In a very anxious patient, the areas to be injected can be iced first or a local anesthetic cream can be applied. Starting with the trapezius muscle can also help, as these injections are the least painful, and the patient cannot see the needle. Finally, it is important to make sure the injections are performed with a sharp needle, and blunt needles are discarded. Thirty-gauge needles only remain sharp for six to eight needle sticks each.
Headache is a universal experience. At present, there are more than 100 different types of headache and one of the most recurring ones is migraine, which affects approximately 10-12% of the population, being three times more common in women than in men. When migraine becomes chronic -occurring more than 15 days a month-, it can disrupt patients' daily life in a great degree.
Other treatment areas that have been proven to be useful include the scalp (for migraine headaches), neck, facial and peripheral muscles (for spasms), arm pits (to inhibit sweating), the bladder and numerous other areas. The way that Botox and Dysport work is that they temporarily inhibit muscle contraction beneath the skin. When underlying muscles are relaxed the overlying folds and wrinkles are smoothed out. These injections work only by weakening underlying muscle contraction are not facial fillers like Restylane or Juvederm. Fillers and Botox or Dysport injections are not interchangeable. These injections work only by weakening underlying muscle contraction are not facial fillers like Restylane or Juvederm. Fillers are not interchangeable with Botox or Dysport injections. Fillers replace or “fill-in” lost facial volume whereas Botox or Dysport only inhibit muscle contraction.Both treatments are in fact complimentary aesthetic injections that will relax wrinkles and folds and help you regain your youthful appearance and enhance your face.

In cosmetic applications, botulinum toxin is considered safe and effective for reduction of facial wrinkles, especially in the uppermost third of the face.[23] Injection of botulinum toxin into the muscles under facial wrinkles causes relaxation of those muscles, resulting in the smoothing of the overlying skin.[23] Smoothing of wrinkles is usually visible three days after treatment and is maximally visible two weeks following injection.[23] The treated muscles gradually regain function, and generally return to their former appearance three to four months after treatment.[23] Muscles can be treated repeatedly to maintain the smoothed appearance.[23]
A concern of both parents and children is whether these injections will be painful. There is no pain linked to the action of the toxin itself, only with the needle injections. To lessen this problem, the skin where the injections will be done is coated with EMLA cream before the procedure . A topical coolant spray is also used right before the needle is put in. This numbs the skin. The child may still feel pressure from the needle and a dull feeling in the muscle. The fact that a child is having a procedure done and is being held in place can upset a child more than the needle going in, even more so for preschool-aged children.
Postmarketing Experience: The following adverse reactions have been identified during postapproval use of LATISSE®: dry skin of the eyelid and/or periocular area, eye swelling, eyelid edema, hypersensitivity (local allergic reactions), lacrimation increased, madarosis and trichorrhexis (temporary loss of a few eyelashes to loss of sections of eyelashes, and temporary eyelash breakage, respectively), periorbital and lid changes associated with a deepening of the eyelid sulcus, rash (including macular and erythematous), skin discoloration (periorbital), and vision blurred.
The last thing I've found to be a little frustrating is that my body tends to metabolize the Botox a bit faster than I can get it. While Ravitz tells me I can't get the treatment any more frequently than every three months, because that's the rate at which the body can develop antibodies against it, I find my migraines amping up in frequency again about two to two and a half months after I get the shots. However, given the fact that with the Botox, my migraines have gone down from about four a week to one or two at most, it's absolutely increased my quality of life, and I'm glad I gave it a shot...or 40.

As you noted in your question, the effects of Botox don't last forever. For some patients the short term effects of Botox are a ‘good thing,’ as it means that trying Botox is a relatively low risk/low commitment procedure. If you don't like your Botox results, there's not much to worry about: They will fade on their own in a few months. Generally speaking, the results last between three to five months -- but the duration of the Botox effect depends on the individual and on how many Botox units were used.
Most doctors who provide cosmetic services such as BOTOX® treatments accept payment by various methods, including cash, personal check, major credit cards, or through arrangements made with an established lending institution. Some practices even offer their own financing plans. Don’t be afraid to inquire about BOTOX® treatment financing during your initial consultation.
The efficacy and safety of BOTOX for the treatment of lower limb spasticity was evaluated in Study 6, a randomized, multi-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Study 6 included 468 post-stroke patients (233 BOTOX and 235 placebo) with ankle spasticity (modified Ashworth Scale ankle score of at least 3) who were at least 3 months post-stroke. A total dose of 300 Units of BOTOX or placebo were injected intramuscularly and divided between the gastrocnemius, soleus, and tibialis posterior, with optional injection into the flexor hallucis longus, flexor digitorum longus, flexor digitorum brevis, extensor hallucis, and rectus femoris (see Table 33) with up to an additional 100 Units (400 Units total dose). The use of electromyographic guidance or nerve stimulation was required to assist in proper muscle localization for injections. Patients were followed for 12 weeks.
Botox stays only where injected, it does not roam through the body. "If I inject it in your face, it's not going to work [or show up in] your toe," says Rowe. "It does not have a systemic effect." However, it may migrate up to 3 cm from where it was injected. But even if some molecules were to go into the bloodstream and travel to distant sites in the body, the cosmetic doses (typically less than 100 units) used are significantly lower than the toxic dose that would be harmful systemically (2,500-3,000 units).
Deaths as a complication of severe dysphagia have been reported after treatment with botulinum toxin. Dysphagia may persist f or several months, and require use of a feeding tube to maintain adequate nutrition and hydration. Aspiration may result from severe dysphagia and is a particular risk when treating patients in whom swallowing or respiratory function is already compromised.
A randomized, multi-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the treatment of cervical dystonia was conducted. This study enrolled adult patients with cervical dystonia and a history of having received BOTOX in an open label manner with perceived good response and tolerable side effects. Patients were excluded if they had previously received surgical or other denervation tre atment for their symptoms or had a known history of neuromuscular disorder. Subjects participated in an open label enrichment period where they received their previously employed dose of BOTOX. Only patients who were again perceived as showing a response were advanced to the randomized evaluation period. The muscles in which the blinded study agent injections we re to be administered were determined on an individual patient basis.
“Your doctor still has to be willing to do the work of filing a waiver and they don’t get reimbursed for that work, so they don’t like to do it,” Hoffman says. Plus, there’s a federal law called ERISA that exempts certain types of employer-provided health plans, called self-funded plans, from the requirements of state laws. So, for roughly a quarter of Americans who have these health plans, the state limitations to step therapy don’t apply.

It's also not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for depression, not that that stops doctors from prescribing it that way. Such off-label use of Botox, like that of any FDA-approved drug, is legal in the U.S. That's because once a drug has been approved by the FDA for a condition, licensed physicians are legally allowed to prescribe it for any medical issue they think it could benefit, regardless of whether it's been proved to work for that condition.
Simply put, "Baby Botox" uses a lower volume of Botox (a.k.a. botulinum toxin injections) than a traditional injection to smooth fine lines and wrinkles. "Instead of using 25 units in an area, you may use 10 units," Melissa Doft, a board-certified plastic surgeon in New York City, tells Allure. "I have many patients who ask for half the normal dose, as they do not want to look frozen but are tired of wrinkles in photos. First-time Botox patients are perfect for this."

In general, you’ll find that Botox costs about $10-$20 per unit. While some offices and clinics charge a flat rate, depending on the area that they’re working on, you’ll more often find that you are charged based on how many units of Botox are used to achieve the results you’re looking for. You need around 20 units to treat your forehead and 5-6 units to treat crows feet, making Botox an affordable alternative to going under the knife.

Some service providers offer financing options to make the procedure affordable. The Botox Cosmetic product is eligible for the Brilliant Distinctions Program that helps the members through savings, rebates, bonus points, and other perks. But there are also some providers with their own rebate program that gives a discount on the next procedure by 10% to 25%. Coupons are available in forms of discount, promo or free service for loyal customers. Also, a large volume of Botox used in the treatment, there is a possibility to avail discounted price of the Botox per unit.
As with all therapeutic proteins, there is a potential for immunogenicity. The detection of antibody formation is highly dependent on the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. Additionally, the observed incidence of antibody (including neutralizing antibo dy) positivity in an assay may be influenced by several factors including assay methodology, sample handling, timing of sample collection, concomitant medications, and underlying disease. For these reasons, comparison of the incidence of antibodies to onabotulinumtoxinA in the studies described below with the incidence of antibodies in other studies or to other products may be misleading.

Many people who experience excessive sweating, whether on their hands, hairline, or even under their breasts or butt, are turning to Botox and other neuromodulators (like Xeomin or Dysport). "They help prevent excessive sweating by acting on the sweat glands directly," says NYC board-certified plastic surgeon Z. Paul Lorenc, MD. "The neuromodulator is injected into the sweat glands to relax the muscle and help combat excessive sweating."
Results can vary depending on who is performing the injection on the patient. It is very important to go to a physician who is experienced at this procedure, does it him- or herself (rather than having a nurse, physician's assistant [PA], or other nonphysician do it), and has a good reputation for performing this type of procedure. The manufacturers of Botox recommend physicians inject the medication themselves. As with most procedures, the skill of the practitioner is related to how often he or she performs the procedure.

If you are seeking a Botox specialist, I have more than thirty years experience injecting Botox in New York City and New Jersey. I am a recognized oculoplastic surgeon – you can find me on Google as Dr. Joel E. Kopelman. I have authored several peer reviewed articles regarding the efficacy and safety of Botox injections. You can easily make an appointment to see me in consultation at our office +1 (212) 831-8333 to set up a consultation with me in either New York or New Jersey.
It may be the most well known, but Botox is just one type of neurotoxin on the market. Other, next-level neurotoxins are Dysport, FDA-approved in 2009, and Xeomin, FDA-approved in 2011. “They all originate from the same strain of bacteria, therefore they work essentially in the same way,” explains Z. Paul Lorenc, MD, a board certified aesthetic plastic surgeon in Manhattan. “There are some nuanced differences between the three,” he adds. Xeomin is a purified neurotoxin, also called a “naked molecule,” because it doesn’t contain any extra surface proteins, the way Botox and Dysport do. This “pure” neurotoxin migrates deeper into skin, works faster, and poses less risk of an allergic reaction. “Theoretically, decreasing the protein load also lessens the chance of becoming a non-responder, meaning it lessens the chance that the patient will become immune to the neuromodulator being injected,” Dr. Lorenc says. Dysport tends to spread a little more than Botox, so it’s good for areas that would otherwise need multiple injections. It also kicks in faster than the other two, typically showing effects after two to three days opposed to seven to ten days with Botox, and five to six days with Xeomin. Once you try the different neurotoxins, you might decide you like one brand better than the others.
The cost for Botox may range from $125 to $400 per treatment area. Multiple areas may be treated at one time, and repeat treatments are needed every three to four months, on average. When it comes to Botox and other injectables, you get what you pay for. Buyer beware: bargain Botox may increase your risk of complications, including poor cosmetic results. If the cost is prohibitive, ask your doctor about payment plans.
Fine lines, frown lines, how-did-those-get-there lines. Whatever you call them, a few minutes of Botox can smooth wrinkles on your forehead, in-between your eyes, and crow’s feet. This is a non-invasive FDA-approved treatment that requires zero downtime, so you can come in and erase those signs of aging on your lunch break. Using a very fine needle we inject Botox intothe facial muscles responsible for those annoying wrinkles, totally relaxing them and reducing their ability to contract. Don’t worry, you’ll be out the door and on your way to feeling refreshed and radiating confidence in no time.
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