After working out techniques for freeze-drying, buffering with albumin, and assuring sterility, potency, and safety, Scott applied to the FDA for investigational drug use, and began manufacturing botulinum type A neurotoxin in his San Francisco lab. He injected the first strabismus patients in 1977, reported its clinical utility in 1980,[47] and had soon trained hundreds of ophthalmologists in EMG-guided injection of the drug he named Oculinum ("eye aligner").
[b] These values represent the prospectively planned method for missing data imputation a nd statistical test. Sensitivity analyses indicated that the 95% confidence interval excluded the value of no difference between groups and the p -value was less than 0.05. These analyses included several alternative missing data imputation methods and non-parametric statistical tests.

Laser tattoo removal has minimal side effects. Lasers break up the pigment of the tattoo with a high-intensity light beam. During the procedure, the patient wears protective eye shields and may be giving anesthesia. The pulse of the laser feels like the snapping of a rubber band against the skin. Possible side effects include a risk of infection, hypopigmentation, and hyperpigmentation.
Vials of BOTOX have a holographic film on the vial label that contains the name “Allergan” within horizontal lines of rainbow color. In order to see the hologram, rotate the vial back and forth between your fin gers under a desk lamp or fluorescent light source. (Note: the holographic film on the label is absent in the date/lot area.) If you do not see the lines of rainbow color or the name “Allergan”, do not use the product and contact Allergan for additional information at 1-800-890-4345 from 7:00 AM to 3:00 PM Pacific Time.
Sharona Hoffman, professor of law and bioethics at Case Western Reserve University School of Law, says that step therapy is driven by a single motivator: saving costs. Hoffman, who’s written about the legal and ethical implications of step therapy, says that sometimes step therapy can have sensible outcomes, like pushing patients to take generics instead of brand-name drugs. But these policies can also keep doctors from prescribing the more expensive drugs of choice, forcing patients to take medications that are less effective or have worse side effects.

The idea of a needle going toward your forehead, in between your eyes, or at your eyebrows might be a little daunting, but rest assured, not only is Botox FDA-approved, but it’s a very common (and highly-requested) procedure. It’s commonly used for cosmetic reasons, but it also helps alleviate a slew of other health concerns.”Botox was first approved by the FDA in 1989 to treat blepharospasm of the eyelid, and now can treat hundreds of medical conditions, such as hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating) or chronic migraines,” dermatologist Jill S. Waibel, MD. She also notes that it was only approved for cosmetic purposes in 2002. “Since then, millions of people have had Botox done safely and effectively. It is important to remember that Botox is safest when used by a board certified dermatologist or a plastic surgeon.”
Do not inject into blood vessels. Introduction of these products into the vasculature may lead to embolization, occlusion of the vessels, ischemia, or infarction. Take extra care when injecting soft-tissue fillers; for example, inject the product slowly and apply the least amount of pressure necessary. Rare, but serious, adverse events associated with the intravascular injection of soft-tissue fillers in the face have been reported and include temporary or permanent vision impairment, blindness, cerebral ischemia or cerebral hemorrhage leading to stroke, skin necrosis, and damage to underlying facial structures. Immediately stop the injection if a patient exhibits any of the following symptoms: changes in vision, signs of a stroke, blanching of the skin, unusual pain during or shortly after the procedure. Patients should receive prompt medical attention and, possibly, evaluation by an appropriate healthcare professional specialist should an intravascular injection occur
The needle should be inserted approximately 2 mm into the detrusor, and 30 injections of 1 mL (~6.7 Units) each (total volume of 30 mL) should be spaced approximately 1 cm apart (see Figure 1). For the final injection, approximately 1 mL of sterile normal s aline should be injected so that the remaining BOTOX in the needle is delivered to the bladder. After the injections are given, the saline used for bladder wall visualization should be drained. The patient should be observed for at least 30 minutes post -injection.
Patients with compromised respiratory status treated with BOTOX for spasticity should be monitored closely. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study in patients treated for upper limb spasticity with stable reduced pulmonary function (defined as FEV1 40-80% of predicted value and FEV1/FVC ≤0.75), the event rate in change of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) ≥15% or ≥20% was generally greater in patients treated with BOTOX than in patients treated with placebo (see Table 5).

Vials of BOTOX have a holographic film on the vial label that contains the name “Allergan” within horizontal lines of rainbow color. In order to see the hologram, rotate the vial back and forth between your fin gers under a desk lamp or fluorescent light source. (Note: the holographic film on the label is absent in the date/lot area.) If you do not see the lines of rainbow color or the name “Allergan”, do not use the product and contact Allergan for additional information at 1-800-890-4345 from 7:00 AM to 3:00 PM Pacific Time.

Botulism is an illness caused by a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. There are three types of botulism: food-borne, wound, and infant. Symptoms include muscle paralysis, dry mouth, constipation, slurred speech, and blurred vision. If food-borne and wound botulism are detected early enough, they may be treated with an antitoxin. Infant botulism is treated intravenously with BabyBIG (Botulism Immune Globulin).
Unremarkable. I mean, that’s a good thing in the MRI-reading world, but I’d like to say my brain is freakin’ remarkable sometimes. Maybe I’m biased. Anyways. Shortly after those tests, the Botox arrived at the office and I was scheduled for my injections. To say I was scared is putting it lightly. Like I mentioned before, I have a complete irrational fear of new medication. Also, I didn’t want my face to look different! So I documented my wrinkles just to see how many would last (if you want, be my guest to check out my embarrassing video). I didn’t have to wait long and before I knew it, I was in a room with my mom, my boyfriend, a neurologist and three needles.
In May, hedge fund Appaloosa Management, run by David Tepper, received antitrust clearance from the Federal Trade Commission to potentially increase its stake in the Botox-maker. This means that Appaloosa now has more flexibility to push for further changes at Allergan. It remains to be seen if that happens, but if so, it could mean more changes are ahead for the drugmaker.
How much is Botox is a frequent question we get in our dermatology offices. The cost of Botox runs typically about $400 – $600 per first treatment area, and up to $300 for each additional area. The most popular areas for Botox treatment are the glabella (those lines in between your eyebrows also known as the “11’s”), the crow’s feet are around the eyes and the horizontal lines on the forehead. When injected by a trained professional who has experience with facial aesthetics, Botox can also give the brows and eye area a mini eye lift. When Botox injections are performed by a trained, licensed and experienced medical expert, the results can be amazing. You will not appear frozen or as though you’ve had work done, when injected properly, Botox makes you look more relaxed, more rejuvenated and just better than before. It’s important to seek out a professional who knows about facial anatomy and can inject you in the exact right places.
A recent encounter with one of my headache patients got me thinking. I am treating this young woman for chronic migraine with BOTOX injections. She told me that one of her other physicians had been surprised to hear about this use for onabotulinumtoxin A. According to my patient, the gastroenterologist’s words were, “BOTOX for migraines? I’ve never heard of that.” 
In the third study, 25 patients with chronic migraine were injected with 12.5 doses of botox into each trigger point twice, during a period of 3 months. Frequency (main variable), intensity and scales of migraine crises were recorded one month before and one month after the treatment to compare the changes experienced. In addition, side effects were also recorded during the experiment, and they were found to be mild and temporary.
I’ve had migraine since I was 5 and have learned a lot over the years about how to manage it. I’m aware of the foods that trigger my migraine attacks, and I try to eat consistently and drink a lot of water. My children and I eat as healthy as possible throughout the day to keep energy up, knowing skipped meals are a trigger for both tantrums and migraine attacks. Staying on a schedule allows my body to stay stable and helps me identify triggers. The same goes for my children. Maintaining their energy and providing them with good food and water prevents them from getting “hangry” later. We all want to avoid a food meltdown. I know that I am triggered by weather, hormones, stress, diet, hydration, light, sound, heat, sleep and more. I try to be prepared for as many of these situations as I can, but some are easier to avoid than others. If you’re unaware of your triggers, keep a log. There are migraine apps that can help you track your symptoms and identify what’s causing your attacks. Finding patterns in how you react may help with identifying effective medications or alternative treatments.
In general, you’ll find that Botox costs about $10-$20 per unit. While some offices and clinics charge a flat rate, depending on the area that they’re working on, you’ll more often find that you are charged based on how many units of Botox are used to achieve the results you’re looking for. You need around 20 units to treat your forehead and 5-6 units to treat crows feet, making Botox an affordable alternative to going under the knife.

But it could be something else altogether. In 2008, Matteo Caleo, a researcher at the Italian National Research Council's Institute of Neuroscience in Pisa, published a controversial study showing that when he injected the muscles of rats with Botox, he found evidence of the drug in the brain stem. He also injected Botox into one side of the brain in mice and found that it spread to the opposite side. That suggested the toxin could access the nervous system and the brain.
The company markets brand products in six therapeutic areas: aesthetics/dermatology/plastic surgery; neurosciences/CNS; eye care; women’s health and urology; GI and cystic fibrosis; and cardiovascular disease and infectious disease. The company's products include Botox (botulinum toxin), Namenda (memantine), Restasis (ciclosporin), Linzess (linaclotide), Bystolic (nebivolol), Juvederm (injectable filler), Latisse (bimatoprost), Lo Loestrin Fe, Estrace (estradiol), Teflaro (ceftaroline fosamil), Dalvance (dalbavancin, Ozurdex (dexamethasone), Optive, Natrelle, Viibryd (vilazodone), Liletta (levonorgestrel), Saphris (asenapine), Enablex (darifenacin), Actonel (risedronic acid), Androderm (testosterone), and Gelnique (oxybutynin).[1]
Chronic migraines are what were formerly known as “transformed” migraines. These are near daily headaches, sometimes with migraine features but otherwise with frequent features of tension headaches. This may sound trivial but the treatment for tension headaches, typically with analgesics, would only make this syndrome worse. We learned that treating these with migraine preventive medications proved mostly effective. The current International Classification of Headache Disorders defines chronic migraine as a recurrent headache that has been ongoing for the past 3 months, occurs on at least 15 days per month, lasts at least 4 hours per day, and has 8 or more days per month when the headache has features of a migraine or responds to a typical migraine medication.

The 5-unit dose that is injected at each site is a very low dose. Earlier studies with total dosing below 155 units failed to show separation from placebo. As a result, I encourage all patients to get a minimum of 155 units, even if they have a small frame. The optional component of the injection paradigm is the 40 units that are used for following the pain sites. The pain sites are the temporalis, occipitalis, and trapezius. These can be held if the injector is concerned. I do not reduce the dose below 155 units as lower doses have not separated from placebo, and thus I may not achieve an adequate headache effect with a lower dose. In fact, most of the time I increase the dose to at least 165 units, as this was the mean dose in the PREEMPT trials. I inject 5 units behind each ear for a bilateral headache and 5 units in two sites behind one ear in a side-locked headache.
Safety and effectiveness of BOTOX® have not been established for the treatment of other upper or lower limb muscle groups or for the treatment of spasticity in pediatric patients under age 18 years. BOTOX® has not been shown to improve upper extremity functional abilities, or range of motion at a joint affected by a fixed contracture. Treatment with BOTOX® is not intended to substitute for usual standard of care rehabilitation regimens.
Robert Anolik, a board-certified, cosmetic dermatologist explains, "The cost for these types of treatments is widely variable, as every patient needs different amounts and in different areas. It could be a few hundred dollars to a few thousand. For example, a patient may have deepened nasolabial folds (smile lines) requiring multiple syringes of Restylane Defyne. Or a patient could need a subtle lift with a small amount of Restylane-Lyft in the cheeks and mid-face. I find many of my patients will come in consistently for Dysport (Dysport spreads out a bit more, so you're able to get a better global balancing, whereas Botox has a little more of an isolated effect) every three to four months on average, and then we will review what might be needed among the fillers. Often more syringes of filler may be needed at first and then we can maintain over time."
It was peculiar advice coming from a shrink, but not without precedent. In 2014, Rosenthal, a clinical professor of psychiatry at Georgetown University School of Medicine, and Dr. Eric Finzi, an assistant professor of psychiatry at George Washington School of Medicine, published a study showing that when people with major depression got Botox, they reported fewer symptoms six weeks later than people who had been given placebo injections. "I'm always on the lookout for things that are unusual and interesting for depression," says Rosenthal, who is widely considered an expert on the condition. "I've found Botox to be helpful, but it's still not mainstream."
The effects of botulinum toxin are different from those of nerve agents involved insofar in that botulism symptoms develop relatively slowly (over several days), while nerve agent effects are generally much more rapid and can be instantaneous.[citation needed] Evidence suggests that nerve exposure (simulated by injection of atropine and pralidoxime) will increase mortality by enhancing botulinum toxin's mechanism of toxicity.[citation needed]
The more areas that need treatment the higher the cost of treatment. The reason is also simple – the cost of Botox or Dysport that the doctor pays for the drugs is relatively expensive and therefore that cost is obviously passed along to the patient. A second factor that many patients are unaware of is that Botox and Dysport come in a powder form that must be mixed with sterile saline to reconstitute the vial. The amount of water that is mixed with the Botox or Dysport determines the concentration of the medicine. Some doctors and nurses dilute the powder too much so that the concentration of Botox or Dysport is weak. So if you go to a provider who advertises a cheap price for injections you should question whether or not you are receiving a very dilute injection.This dilute mixture typically does not produce the same effect as a more or not concentrated (more expensive) injection and does not last as long.
The use of Botox for migraines was, like many other new applications for the drug, a kind of happy accident. A Beverly Hills plastic surgeon observed that people who got Botox for wrinkles were reporting fewer headaches, paving the way for studies about migraines. Similarly, doctors in Europe were intrigued when they noticed that their patients who got Botox for facial spasms were sweating less than usual.
It may be necessary for the patient to have additional procedures, such as the use of filler substances (for example, Restylane, Perlane, Juvederm, Sculptra, or Radiesse) in order to plump up the wrinkles that are now relaxed. Additionally, it may be necessary to have two or three sessions of Botox treatment for deeper wrinkles before results become optimal. The area of the crease between the eyes is a particularly ideal area for Botox use in conjunction with filler as these fixed wrinkles don't always respond optimally to Botox alone. There is some controversy about using filler in that area as it may block veins or arteries and result in loss of blood and a scar to the area. Generally, the smaller particle fillers, such as Restylane or Juvederm Ultra, are best in the area between the eyes for this reason.
There have been reports following administration of BOTOX® of adverse events involving the cardiovascular system, including arrhythmia and myocardial infarction, some with fatal outcomes. Some of these patients had risk factors including pre-existing cardiovascular disease. Use caution when administering to patients with pre-existing cardiovascular disease.
Since then, several randomized control trials have shown botulinum toxin type A to improve headache symptoms and quality of life when used prophylactically for patients with chronic migraine[88] who exhibit headache characteristics consistent with: pressure perceived from outside source, shorter total duration of chronic migraines (<30 years), "detoxification" of patients with coexisting chronic daily headache due to medication overuse, and no current history of other preventive headache medications.[89]
Botox for migraines has been something that has flown under the radar, as many people know Botox as a procedure simply aimed at hiding fine lines. We turned to Matthew S. Robbins, MD, director of inpatient services at Montefiore Headache Center and the chief of neurology at the Jack D. Weiler Hospital, Montefiore, to break down the procedure for us. Scroll down to see what he has to say.
* LS mean change, treatment difference and p-value are based on an analysis using an ANCOVA model with baseline weekly endpoint as covariate and treatment group, etiology at study entry (spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis), concurrent anticholinergic therapy at screening, and investigator as factors. LOCF values were used to analyze the primary efficacy variable.
What is Botox? | How much does Botox cost? | Where can I find Botox deals near me? | How does Botox work? | How long does it take for Botox to work? | How long does Botox last? | Is Botox a treatment for migraines? What about sweating? | Am I eligible for Botox? | Dysport vs. Botox | What are the Botox injection sites? | What are the side effects of Botox?
It can also be expensive. Depending on your insurance, it can cost quite a lot of money — I've changed insurance providers since I first started, and my first provider was around $330 a month and charged me around $1,000 per Botox round (remember, that's four times a year). My new plan is much more expensive, around $600 a month, but the Botox copay is only $30 each time, so even if Botox is the only medical procedure I need to have done in the year, it made sense to switch.

That Groupon offer might be tempting, but Dr. Tutela recommends doing a thorough vetting of your practitioner’s history and methods before signing up for treatment. “I think it is important to ask any provider if they perform that procedure frequently, to gauge their experience,” he says. He also suggests to ask if they’ve experienced any major complications and to check their online reviews. “You can get a sense of how you will be treated and what kind of experience other patients have had,” Dr. Tutela says. “Many of those low-cost, high-volume practices are loaded with horrible reviews from disappointed patients.”
Treatment with botulinum toxins may weaken neck muscles that serve as accessory muscles of ventilation. This may result in a critical loss of breathing capacity in patients with respiratory disorders who may have become dependent upon these accessory muscles. There have been postmarketing reports of serious breathing difficulties, including respiratory failure.
If you undergo Botox treatments for migraines, your doctor will typically administer them once every three months. Depending on your response to Botox, your doctor will recommend a length of time for your treatment plan. Each session will last between 10 and 15 minutes. During the sessions, your doctor will inject multiple doses of the medicine into specific points along the bridge of your nose, your temples, your forehead, the back of your head, your neck, and your upper back.
Other adverse reactions that occurred more frequently in the BOTOX group compared to the placebo group at a frequency less th an 1% and potentially BOTOX related include: vertigo, dry eye, eyelid edema, dysphagia, eye infection, and jaw pain. Severe worsening of migraine requiring hospitalization occurred in approximately 1% of BOTOX treated patients in Study 1 and Study 2, usually within the first week after treatment, compared to 0.3% of placebo-treated patients.
As with with plastic surgery or any other cosmetic procedure, what you are paying for is an injector who has experience and a proven track record of beautiful results. If you're looking for a precise estimate of what it will cost to achieve your Botox goals, I encourage you to meet with a board-certified plastic surgeon or dermatologist for an initial consultation.
It takes a village to raise a child. My family members are well aware of how I cope with migraine. They make themselves available to help my children and me often. I rely on people to drive me to doctor’s appointments as well as take my children to sports practices. I arrange carpools and am honest with the people in our lives about how a migraine attack can be unpredictable and suddenly change plans. Every year, I alert my children’s teachers of my chronic migraine and ask them to watch and listen for signs of migraine or stress in my children. I worry about them physically and emotionally and so far, they have handled my disease as they would any other illness. By being honest about the help I need, I find that the people in my life are better equipped to follow through. Many people would like to help but don’t know how. I have given up pride and allowed others to help, which inevitably takes stress away from us all.
Botox is a neurotoxin derived from the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Ingested in contaminated food, it can interfere with key muscles in the body, causing paralysis and even death. But when injected in tiny doses into targeted areas, it can block signals between nerves and muscles, causing the muscles to relax. That's how it smooths wrinkles: when you immobilize the muscles that surround fine lines, those lines are less likely to move--making them less noticeable. It's also why it's FDA-approved to treat an overactive bladder: Botox can prevent involuntary muscle contractions that can cause people to feel like they have to pee even when they don't.
Why Botox works isn’t completely clear. There’s some evidence that it may reduce the production of neurotransmitters related to pain in the areas where it’s injected. There’s also some evidence that it may have a broader effect on the brain’s pain centers, reducing the sensitivity that causes migraine sufferers to react to migraine triggers. While the exact mechanisms are poorly understood, the studies, as well as many of my patients’ experiences, do show a real benefit for many people.
The average price for Botox in the Houston area is $14-15/unit. Most providers nowadays will offer specials. In addition, Botox has a "rewards" program that gives you $25 off each treatment done within 3-6 mos of the last treatment, as long as it's done at the same office. Treatment of the glabella, crow's feet and forehead require 25-50 units, depending on the severity of the lines.
This product contains albumin, a derivative of human blood. Based on effective donor screening and product manufacturing processes, it carries an extremely remote risk for transmission of viral diseases and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). There is a theoretical risk for transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), but if that risk actually exists, the risk of transmission would also be considered extremely remote. No cases of transmission of viral diseases, CJD or vCJD have ever been identified for licensed albumin or albumin contained in other licensed products.
Younger patients have been increasingly hopping on the Botox bandwagon as a preventative measure—even before the wrinkles appear or deepen. That’s why dermatologists can’t recommend the best age to start or try Botox, since it depends on your goals, your facial expressions, and your preference. If all you see when you look at a photo of yourself is that forehead wrinkle instead of your bright eyes or smile, it might make you happier to get the wrinkle taken care of. “Each time we raise our eyebrows, or scowl by bringing our eyebrows together, the wrinkles in these locations get deeper and more numerous. It happens slowly over a long period of time, so you don’t notice it on a daily basis,” Dr. Tutela says. “But if you look at the horizontal wrinkles in your forehead when you are not raising your eyebrows, you will see an increase in these wrinkles when you do raise your brows. If you then hold that raised brow position for 10 seconds, you will notice when you relax, your forehead wrinkles look deeper and more numerous. Botox prevents this from happening.” It’s almost never too early to start a good anti-aging regimen. Learn the most in-demand cosmetic treatments across the US.
The Botox used for migraines and the Botox used for cosmetic procedures is actually exactly the same. "Basically, young and middle-aged women were getting [Botox] for cosmetic purposes, and that’s the most common person that has migraines, and that’s how they figured out it was helpful," Ravitz tells me. Women were getting Botox for aesthetic reasons and happened to notice relief from their migraine symptoms, and doctors began looking into it as a direct treatment. In fact, women are disproportionately affected by migraines — about 85 percent of chronic-migraine sufferers are women, and the condition affects 28 million in just the U.S.

Patients with compromised respiratory status treated with BOTOX for spasticity should be monitored closely. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study in patients treated for upper limb spasticity with stable reduced pulmonary function (defined as FEV1 40-80% of predicted value and FEV1/FVC ≤0.75), the event rate in change of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) ≥15% or ≥20% was generally greater in patients treated with BOTOX than in patients treated with placebo (see Table 5).


Scientists at the University of Granada have confirmed that injecting a local anesthetic or botulinum toxin (botox) into certain points named "trigger points" of the pericraneal and neck muscles reduce migraine frequency among migraine sufferers. University of Granada researchers have identified the location of these trigger points -which activation results in migraine- and their relationship with the duration and severity of this condition.
The cosmetic benefits came to light in the 1990s by happy coincidence. “The aesthetic indications were purely happenstance,” says board-certified surgeon and clinical professor Seth L. Matarasso, MD, who has been treating his clients with Botox since the 1990s but is not affiliated with the brand. “Dr. [Jean] Carruthers was working with patients with strabismus...[and] with diplopia [double vision], and her patients were coming in and saying, ‘Gee, my wrinkles are better.'" Soon enough, doctors were using Botox for what it is most commonly associated with today — nixing lines.
Botox lasts only around three months (or more when you first start getting injections), so get ready to go in for maintenance every three to six months. Because it’s only meant to temporarily relax your muscles, it wears off over time, and you’ll notice your wrinkle start to appear again. “As skin ages, the skin loses elasticity and collagen breaks down, so constant muscle and skin contraction can create more permanent creases (wrinkles). Within a few months of injecting the botox, the body makes new acetylcholine receptors, and the nerves are able to conduct their impulses again,” Dr. Shainhouse explains. “You must use neurotoxins continuously in order to reduce muscle movement and prevent long-term skin creasing.” Find out more secrets from dermatologists about how to prevent and treat wrinkles.
Baby Botox can be used pretty much anywhere on your face, but it's best to create subtle changes or to erase fine lines. "Something like this is especially nice for an area like the crow's feet, which is a very delicate area where a subtle treatment is more effective," explains Smith. "If someone has very deep folds, micro Botox probably isn't going to cut it. I would offer this to someone with moderate to fine lines."
Botox (also known as Vistabel outside the U.S. and the U.K.) is an injection that temporarily relaxes facial muscles to reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, as well as prevent new lines from forming. Common injection sites include the forehead, the area between the eyebrows, the corners of the eyes, and the sides of the chin. Botox can also be used for a wide variety of other conditions, including migraines, excessive sweating, and psoriasis. LEARN MORE ›
Table 14 presents the most frequently reported adverse reactions in a placebo-controlled, double-blind post-approval 52 week study with BOTOX 100 Units (Study NDO-3) conducted in MS patients with urinary incontinence due to detrusor overactivity associated with a neurologic condition. These patients were not adequately managed with at least one anticholinergic agent and not catheterized at baseline. The table below presents the most frequently reported adverse reactions within 12 weeks of injection.
Intradetrusor injection of BOTOX® is contraindicated in patients with overactive bladder or detrusor overactivity associated with a neurologic condition who have a urinary tract infection (UTI). Intradetrusor injection of BOTOX® is also contraindicated in patients with urinary retention and in patients with post-void residual (PVR) urine volume > 200 mL, who are not routinely performing clean intermittent self-catheterization (CIC).
CONDITIONS OF USE: The information in this database is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of healthcare professionals. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of a particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective for you or anyone else. A healthcare professional should be consulted before taking any drug, changing any diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment.
There are eight types of botulinum toxin, named type A–H. Types A and B are capable of causing disease in humans, and are also used commercially and medically.[3] Types C–G are less common; types E and F can cause disease in humans, while the other types cause disease in other animals.[4] Type H is considered the deadliest substance in the world – an injection of only 2 ng can cause death to an adult.[5] Botulinum toxin types A and B are used in medicine to treat various muscle spasms and diseases characterized by overactive muscle. Commercial forms are marketed under the brand names Botox and Dysport, among others.[6][7]
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